Epilepsy

Epilepsy is a neurological disorder categorized by unpredictable seizures, with a wide range of types and control varying between people. Along with seizures one might experience many other symptoms such as:

  • Convulsion
  • Blackouts
  • Confused memory
  • Fainting
  • Loss of bowel/bladder control
  • Body stiffness
  • Unresponsiveness
  • Fearfulness or anger
  • Sudden bouts of chewing or blinking

Benefits: Cannabidiol was effective in reducing frequency as well as severity of seizures in patients suffering with epilepsy. High levels of CBD have shown to drastically reduce seizures and some people even became seizure free. Patients struggling with treatment resistance epilepsy are encouraged to try CBD since many patients have found treatments to be very effective.  

Treatment: Treatment of epilepsy with cannabis is done through CBD, the non-psychoactive ingredient in cannabis. Avoid strains containing THC, which may cause anxiety and impairment. Vaporizing or mixing oils into food each day will reduce the likelihood of seizures, as well as side effects associated with seizures.

Recommended method of intake: Oils, vaping, edibles.

Fibromyalgia

Fibromyalgia is a disorder that causes muscle pain and fatigue. It is often found coexisting with other chronic pain conditions. Symptoms may include:

  • Numbness or tingling in hands and feet
  • Drowsiness/fatigue
  • Widespread pain
  • Moodiness
  • Headaches
  • Cognitive and memory difficulties

Benefits: Cannabis strains containing both THC and CBD are known to be the best pain relievers. Those suffering from fibromyalgia have found that treating their symptoms with cannabis rather than prescription drugs, they can better treat their ever changing symptoms as well as not have to suffer with all the side effects that come with prescription medication. Strains containing CBD and THC can relieve widespread pain and headaches.

Treatment: Microdosing throughout the day helps to aid with pain intensity. Using strains higher in CBD or CBD oils minimizes psychoactive effects but decreases pain as well as provides the body with energy to get through the day. Microdosing strains that contain higher level of THC, decreases cognitive and psychoactive side effects.
In the evening a combination of indica edibles as well as vaporizing will allows for good night sleep, which then helps with controlling symptoms the next day.  

Recommended method of intake: Smoking, vaping, tinctures, edibles

MS- Multiple Sclerosis (MS)

MS occurs when the immune system attacks myelin, which wraps around nerve fibers. This effects how the nerves work and therefore the damaged nerve fibers are not able to correctly send signals throughout the body. This can lead to:

  • Muscle spasms
  • Muscle stiffness
  • Unusual sensations
  • Pain
  • Fatigue
  • Tremors
  • Lack of concentration  
  • Bladder/digestive problems

Benefits: Cannabis strains that contains equal to or higher amounts of CBD than THC are most beneficial to those suffering with multiple sclerosis. Cannabis has a positive effect on muscle spasticity, stiffness and pain. People find that spasms decrease, muscles relax and they have more control over their body. Due to the anti-inflammatory properties of THC and CBD, inflammation within the brain has decreased in patients over time. The ability of THC to stimulate appetite causes the body to release digestive enzymes, which in turn increase the body’s metabolism and aid in any gastrointestinal issues people with MS might have.

Unfortunately due to side effects of THC, we do not see much of an improvement with cognitive functions.

Treatment: Thus far the best treatment for those who live with MS includes treatment specifically with indica strains. These strains have more of a body relaxation effect, and less of an energetic effect. Indica edibles an hour before bed will aid with insomnia, and can help with staying asleep longer. During the day CBD oils or extracts can be mixed in with food to help with any pain and muscle stiffness or spasms.

Recommended method of intake: Oral spray, and extracts, edibles

Why Whole Plant Medicine Matters

The nature of the plant

Take a close look at your cannabis buds. They’re covered in a sticky dusting of crystal resin, which contains hundreds of therapeutic compounds known as cannabinoids and terpenoids. We assume you’re well acquainted with THC and CBD, but these are just two among many important players working together to produce specific effects. This interactive synergy between marijuana compounds has been coined the “entourage effect,” and once you know what this is, you’ll see why medicines containing only THC or CBD aren’t sufficient for many medical conditions.

THC-only medicines primarily refer to synthetic renderings of THC, the two most popular being Marinol (dronabinol) and Cesamet (nabilone). These are legal pharmaceuticals primarily prescribed to treat cancer-related nausea, but their efficacy is questionable. A 2011 survey on forms of consumption found only 1.8% of 953 patients prefer synthetic THC pharmaceuticals over inhaled or infused methods. Furthermore, it can take hours for a THC-only pill to deliver relief whereas inhaled methods take effect immediately.

CBD-only medicines have been gaining momentum in recent years following the media frenzy around Charlotte’s Web, a non-psychoactive cannabis strain that was processed into a CBD-rich oil for an epileptic child. This miraculous remedy prompted several states to adopt CBD-only laws under which THC-rich medicines remain illegal.

That is not to say that synthetic, hemp-based, and CBD-only medicines aren’t effective options for many patients, especially as laws limit access to alternatives. These types of products have served a monumental role both as medicine and as a legislative stepping stone. But what else can patients get from whole plant medicine?

Modern Therapeutic Applications Of The Cannabinoid Ratio

The most recent research into THC:CBD ratios comes out of the pharmaceutical industry, specifically around the GW Pharmaceuticals‘ Sativex, which has a 1:1 ratio of THC and CBD. In the clinical trials phase of drug development, researchers examined the effects of THC, CBD, and combination extracts on sleep, pain control, and muscle spasms. They found that 1:1 THC-CBD extracts provided the most therapeutic relief across all categories.

In cancer, cannabis has long been credited with helping people combat the nausea associated with chemotherapy. Furthermore, THC and CBD each possess cytotoxic (cell destroying) and anti-angiogenic (prevention of development of new blood vessels) properties. These two properties are critical to combating the spread of cancer within the body, making whole-plant cannabis extracts a viable medical option.

“While cannabinoid ratios in most cannabis may be about the same, it is the terpene content which typically creates the different qualities that we have parsed as the difference between Indicas and Sativas for some time. It is highly likely that terpenes may very well alter the properties of the cannabinoids. Standardized testing is essential to the advancement of our understanding of this issue.”

2:1 THC to CBD Ratios

Contrary to popular misconception, so-called indica varieties are no more likely to have CBD than sativas. Lab studies by the WercShop, co-sponsored by California NORML, found no relation between chemical profiles, as measured by cannabinoid and terpene content, and varietal types, whether indica or sativa. Breeders have developed special high-CBD hybrids from various genetic stock. Some have virtually pure CBD, while others typically have THC; CBD ratios ranging from 2:1 to 1:2.

The optimal dosage levels of CBD are uncertain due to a lack of human studies. Chronic high doses of up to 1500 mg per day are well tolerated and produce no noticeable physiological effects. However, there is evidence to suggest that the medical benefits of CBD disappear when dosages become excessive. For inhaled medical use, most users prefer varieties with THC:CBD ratios between 2:1 and 1:2. Extremely low-THC varieties are useful for making CBD extracts and tinctures. Unlike THC, CBD does not show up positive on standard drug tests for marijuana.

Cannabinoids and Terpenes
Work Together

The diverse chemical availability in whole plant medicines is remarkable in its own right, but research looking into how cannabinoids and terpenoids work together adds another level of intrigue.

Instrumental in this area of science is Ethan Russo, M.D., a neurologist who has long studied cannabis compounds and their role in the body. In his study “Taming THC: potential cannabis synergy and phytocannabinoid-terpenoid entourage effects,” he details how cannabis compounds influence each other’s mechanisms. We aren’t just talking about the well-known THC-CBD tag team here – even small amounts of terpenes (fragrant oils that give cannabis its smell) can make a difference.

The terpene myrcene, for example, can reduce resistance in the blood-brain barrier, enabling easier passage of other beneficial chemicals. Pinene helps counteract compromised cognition and memory caused by THC. A combination of terpenes pinene, myrcene, and caryophyllene help unravel anxiety. Mixing terpenes linalool and limonene with the cannabinoid CBG shows promise in the treatment of MRSA. THC plus CBN yields enhanced sedating effects. Linalool and limonene combined with CBD is being examined as an anti-acne treatment.

These examples only scratch the surface of all possible synergies made available to us by way of whole plant therapies. Think of all the medical possibilities waiting for us as the combinational potential of these compounds is unlocked. The thought of how many lives could be changed for the better by such discoveries is almost overwhelming.

What is CBD?

CBD or Cannabidiol is the principal non-psychoactive cannabinoid present largely in the Hemp plant. Along with not having  psychoactive properties, CBD is a powerful anti-psychotic drug and valuable for anyone with psychosis or schizophrenia. CBD has been shown to be a better anti-inflammatory than THC and Ibuprofen, it is also effective treating pain and managing tumors. CBD can also help to relieve anxiety and depression. Due to the fact that it is non-psychoactive and strongly medicinal even in small doses, CBD is highly recommended for treatment of children, the elderly, and anyone who wants to remain clear headed yet medicated.

Scientific research has shown that CBD may be therapeutic for many conditions, including (but not limited to) chronic pain, cancer, anxiety, diabetes, epilepsy, rheumatoid arthritis, PTSD, sleep disorders, alcoholism, cardiovascular disease, antibiotic-resistant infections, and various neurological ailments.

CBD Hemp Oil Beauty Products provides unique skin protection. Cannabidiol-rich hemp oil comes as an exfoliant, cleanser, eye cream, gel masque, moisturizer and serum. It turns out that it is the real deal – at least for dry skin. There is clinical research that cannabinoids have anti-aging and antioxidant – properties. There are findings confirming that cannabinoids are responsible for lipid production and, therefore, for regulating conditions such as dry skin or acne and has the potential for helping unspecified skin disease.

Vaporization

Vaporization is the optimal delivery method for dried flower cannabis. Unlike smoking, vaporization is achieved by heating the cannabis to a temperature that vaporizes, but does not burn the cannabinoids, virtually eliminating the health risks associated with smoking. The effects of inhaled cannabis – whether smoked or vaporized – will be felt in a matter of minutes. It is recommended to pause between inhalations to let the dose be fully realized.

Edible Oils

It is important to remember that cannabis taken orally has a slower onset time than when it is vaporized because it is absorbed through the digestive system. Wait at least four hours after the first dose before taking a second of cannabis oils.

Patients should follow extreme caution when dosing cannabis oils for the first time.

Suggested Dosing

For casual users, people who don’t have high tolerances, 10-20 milligrams should be more than enough to feel the effects. 10 milligrams is the recommended serving size for edibles, because you don’t want to take too much at once. In one recent Canadian study, 25 mg of pharmaceutical-grade cannabis with a THC (delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol) content of 9.4% was effective in reducing intensity of pain, improved sleep and was well tolerated when smoked as a single inhalation 3x/day for five days at low tolerance to THC.

CBD for Animals

What is CBD and how can it help my pet?

CBD or Cannabidiol is one of the prominent active cannabinoids within cannabis.

Unlike THC, CDB does not have a psychoactive effect, thus making it safe and comfortable for our pets. Most animal CBD products are derived from hemp which contains no THC and has shown beneficial effects on both chronic and acute ailments.  

CBD can help with treatments of:

  • Seizures
  • Inflammation
  • Nausea
  • Stress and anxiety
  • Arthritis
  • Cancer
  • Appetite stimulation
  • Aggression
  • Gastrointestinal issues
  • General pain

Results may not be immediate depending on the ailment.

What are the different methods of giving my pet CBD?

CBD Oils. CBD oils allow for a more controlled dosage. Oil extracts are typically more concentrated compared to other CBD products.

CBD oil is often used for the treatment of cancers as well as central nervous system disorders and other serious ailments.

Oils can but put directly into your pets mouth, or mixed in with food or a treat.

Tinctures. Pet tinctures are usually based on coconut or other vegetable oils. They can be made with either hemp extract or CBD isolate. They tend to be less concentrated than CBD oils, making them ideal for daily use to alleviate milder symptoms such as:

  • Muscle pain
  • Nausea
  • Stress and anxiety.

Similarly to oil, they can be put directly into your pet’s mouth, or mixed in with food or a treat.

Topicals. Infused topicals are remedies used for animals that suffer from bodily aches and pains or other external maladies. They are applied directly to the skin to deliver targeted, localized relief. Topicals help to relieve ailments such as:

  • Allergies
  • Arthritis
  • Skin irritations
  • Muscle pain
  • Joint pain
  • Localized irritation and discomfort
  • Bruising and abrasions

Edibles. Edible treats for pets are CBD infused treats which can be administered for a variety of ailments.

Edibles can be used for both chronic and acute diseases.

How much should I give my pet?

Dosage will be different each pet. The best way is to start off small and gradually work your way up to the recommended dosage level, based on what effects you see.

Different CBD products will have different dosage instructions based on the concentration as well as what it is being used for.

For dogs the most recommended starting dosage is 0.5mg per 10lbs of body weight per day. And for cats, it is 1mg per 10lbs of body weight.

Are there side effects?

Although CBD has no known adverse side effects, trace amounts of THC from non-hemp sourced CBD may cause a change in your pet’s behaviour. If you observe any of the following in your pet, discontinue usages:

  • Disorientation
  • Unstable movement
  • Vomiting
  • Excessive sleepiness

For more information, please visit www.medicinewheelnaturalhealing.com or come in and visit us at 8986 Hwy 45, near the town of Roseneath. Our store is open 10am-8pm, Tuesday through Sunday and closed on Mondays. You can also call us at 905-352-3322.

Alderville First Nation hosts next indigenous cannabis gathering

On Sunday, November 26th, indigenous people interested in the cannabis industry will be gathering from 12-5pm at the Community Hall in Alderville.

One of the outcomes of the October 21st indigenous cannabis meeting in Six Nations was a commitment from Medicine Wheel Natural Healing owner Rob Stevenson to organize a follow up gathering in his home community.

With the community hall of the  Alderville First Nation now booked, Stevenson has confirmed the meeting will be going ahead on Sunday, November 26th from 12-5pm.

In the first part of the meeting, Stevenson and members of his staff will make a presentation on the healing benefits of cannabis and talk about the experiences they’ve been having with their store and the community they serve.

The second part of the meeting will be for indigenous people involved in, or interested in becoming part of the indigenous cannabis industry. This session will discuss the current political situation regarding cannabis legalization in Ontario, and consider the drafting of a common unity declaration between indigenous participants in the industry.

This meeting comes in the wake of a  gathering organized in Six Nations on October 21st. Despite being shut out of the community hall by band council, over 50 people gathered to share information and to make plans for the future.

That meeting saw participants encourage each other to get involved in the cannabis industry before the July 2018 planned legalization by the Federal government.

Indigenous people are claiming the right to use cannabis for medicinal purposes across Canada. In 2017, over 30 dispensaries on indigenous territories have opened in Ontario alone. Unlike dispensaries off-reserve, the province has no jurisdiction on reserve, and the question of how cannabis on reserve will be handled remains an open one.

Marijuana dispensary operates in grey area

http://www.thepeterboroughexaminer.com/2017/10/22/marijuana-dispensary-operates-in-grey-area

By PETE FISHER, Northumberland Today

ALDERVILLE – There are different opinions on whether a marijuana dispensary located on Alderville First Nation is legal.

The Medicine Wheel Natural Healing – Indigenous Healing Through Medicinal Cannabis is located on County Road 45 in Alderville, north of Cobourg.

It had a “soft” opening in June and has been doing a brisk business since then.

Owner Rob Stevenson, who lives on Alderville First Nation and belongs to the Bear Clan, said in a interview on the business’s Facebook page that it is a holistic healing centre and “creating a economic boom for the community,” and also helping people “rise up from poverty.”

Stevenson describes himself in the interview as having a lot of morals, values and ethics.

Stevenson said the Medicine Wheel Natural Healing had a “really good acknowledgement from chief and council. They are very supportive of it.”

But when contacted by Northumberland Today, Alderville First Nation Chief James Marsden said he couldn’t comment on the matter because he is in conflict, as Stevenson is his nephew.

Stevenson said by way of video on the businesses site when a new customer comes in to the store they will go to a “consultation counter” where they fill out a form about ailments.

“We get a lot of information from them,” he said. “They get a membership card and everything they purchase goes under their file. “Importance of that is we can monitor how the medications are working for our customers – maybe it’s to strong, not strong enough.”

Reached by phone, Stevenson said “It’s legal. We are on sovereign territory. So the provincial and federal government can’t dictate what we do.”

Stevenson said it’s similar to the tobacco laws. “We’re a sovereign nation, so it depends what each community wants to do.”

Stevenson said a different dispensary located on Alderville First Nation was raided by OPP last year and the owner was charged.

Even though it was on a reservation, Stevenson said the owner was not Indige and that’s why he was charged.

“That’s why all my staff are First Nation,” he said.

Stevenson said he spoke with Northumberland OPP Insp. Lisa Darling who said the business was fine, but if he was aware any type of criminal element coming in to notify police immediately and police also wanted his security system monitored. Darling didn’t respond to requests for comment.

One item Stevenson does add is if people do buy it on the reserve, if they go off, “they could be prosecuted. If they got caught and don’t have a prescription, then absolutely they could get in trouble for that.”

Staff Sgt. Carolle Dionne, an Ontario Provincial Police media relations coordinator, said if a First Nation community has its own policing service, that service would enforce the laws around medical marijuana dispensaries.

Since there is no First Nation community police in Alderville, it would be up to the Ontario Provincial Police to enforce, she said.

The federal government is proposing to make marijuana legal with strict regulations by July 1, 2018, but until that time, even if a marijuana dispensary is on a reservation, they are still illegal, states the OPP.

“The concern remains with these dispensaries, they are not authorized by the government licensing bodies to dispense marijuana,” Dionne said. “Because they are not licensed, they are not authorized. Even today, right now their legal standing and expectation is we’re going to enforce the law because it is considered sort of trafficking of illegal products. It’s an illegal activity – these dispensaries. Our stance is, if it’s illegal we will enforce the law until told otherwise.”

Ontario Regional Chief Isadore Day, who represents 133 chiefs across Ontario, said marijuana dispensaries on First Nations land is inevitable.

Day said he had been to dispensaries and was “quite impressed by the way some of these dispensaries have started to create a level of excellence in their own facilities.

“If we know dispensaries and distribution and economy is going to be created in the mainstream, why not First Nation?”

But, Day added, “everything right now is illegal.”

Day said at this stage, with the new laws taking effect in the near future, there is very little enforcement.

“That moratorium on enforcement seems pretty consistent across the board,” he said. “This is I believe why the federal government is moving very quickly to put legislation in place.”

Day said although marijuana isn’t part of the Indigenous medicine wheel, he explains, “we know that marijuana or the cannabis plant has been part of this continent.

“What our people will tell you is whatever grows on this land, will be part of that relationship that we have and we have every right to co-exist and responsibility to co-exist with that on our land and in our territories.”

Day said it’s a very important discussion and will be a debate.

“But the direction of medical cannabis, recreational cannabis – it’s going to happen and our people will certainly secure our rightful place using it as a formal medicine and using as their economic right.”

Some Indigenous communities have made it clear they do not want dispensaries on their land and that is their wish, and right, he said.

“The difference between colonial governments and First Nation governments, despite the fact the Indian Act is there and there is supposed assumed authority the Federal Government has over First Nation people, it simply isn’t the case within our communities.”

It’s a complex question for each community to discuss and also to decide, he said.

Day said just days ago he secured a mandate from the Assembly of First Nations executive and he will be heading up a national working group on cannabis with the Regional Chief in Quebec.

They will be looking at the cannabis legislation on four perspectives, health, social, economic and jurisdictional.

“Our work over the next several months will be to make sure our communities are getting the proper information that we coordinate discussions with various parts of government and that our regions (Ontario, Quebec, Saskatchewan) have the ability a bit more so they are engagement ready and how provincial jurisdiction will apply and how provinces and territories are going to respond to the Cannabis Act.”

“We’re working hard to make sure our First Nation are going to be intelligently response to C-45 and 46 and we need to make sure our First Nations are going to be safe, secure and if we can prosper they can do that as well.”

Pfisher@postmedia.com

twitter.com/NT_pfisher

A 5 part video tour of Medicine Wheel’s new grow facility

Ever since we opened on June 21st, 2017, Medicine Wheel Natural Healing has been  working all out to bring our patients the very best in herbal based natural healing. For us that means knowing exactly what is in all the medicines we are providing, and making sure that we provide the safest and most high quality medicine available.

Therefore we have taken steps to be able to grow our own supply, and to be able to test all products that are sold out of our store. The following five part series provides an in-depth look at our efforts in this regard as we build a federally licensed grow operation and educational centre right next to our store in Alderville First Nation.

In September of 2017, Gary Wassaykeesic of Real People’s Media was given a comprehensive tour of the facilities. Here is his report. All video filming and editing by Tom Keefer.

 

There’s some exciting new developments at Medicine Wheel that have been taking place in September. Owner Rob Stevenson gives an overview about the new grow operation and educational centre that he is establishing next to his store.

 

A few days after the first video, Medicine Wheel owner Rob Stevenson takes Gary Wassaykeesic of Real People’s Media on a tour of the licensed grow operation and education facility that is the most recent addition to his facility.

Rob explains to Gary Wassaykeesic why he’s planning to grow next to his store, and the purposes of the three newly delivered portables that have been recently delivered.

In this segment, Rob explains why the buildings have been levelled the way they have and tours the inside of the newly delivered buildings.

This building is where clones will be grown and where hand trimming of the final product will take place.

Dalton takes Gary Wassaykeesic on a tour of Medicine Wheel’s state of the art testing facility. This machinery is used to test all of the medicine sold at the store, and can determine both CBD and THC levels of the product.

 

Even more video!

And if all these videos aren’t enough for you, we encourage you to check out this facility tour of MWNH also conducted by Gary Wassaykeesic. This video was made in August of 2017 and features Rob Stevenson doing a walk through of the store.

 

The Medicine Wheel Healing Centre is located on Alderville First Nation 8986 county road 45 Roseneath K0K 2X0 just off of Highway 45, near the town of Roseneath. The Alderville First Nation is located on the south shore of Rice Lake. Peterborough is on the North side of the lake, Oshawa is to the west, and Coburg and Port Hope are due south on Highway 45. The store is open 11am-7pm, Tuesday through Sunday and closed on Mondays. Call anytime at (905) 352-3322.

Medicine Wheel Grand Opening

 

Medicine Wheel Natural Healing would like to thank everyone who came out to our Grand Opening on August 26th. We invite you to check out our videos from the days events and the picture gallery below! Thank you to all the vendors and participants in the day’s events.

 

Rob Stevenson, the owner of Medicine Wheel began the event by thanking everyone for coming out.

Brian Marquis is the President of the Ontario Indigenous Medical Cannabis Association then shared a few words.

In the second part of this video, Marquis explains the purpose and mission of the National Indigenous Medical Cannabis Association.

Kevin Shaganash rocked the day away, and kept the crowds entertained! Here he is with his hit song “Idle No More.”

Kevin Shaganash singing “Sweet Cedar Tea.”

Herbalist Lisa Messenger was on site to share her knowledge of herbal medicine. Messenger has been trained in both Western and Indigenous modalities of herbal medicine, and will be working with Medicine Wheel Natural Healing to help clients with a wider range of herbal remedies.

 

 

 

 

Cannabis dispensary on Alderville First Nation wants Ottawa to butt out

Video and story here.

Annette Francis 
APTN National News
Business has been good at a new cannabis dispensary on Alderville First Nation near Peterboroug, Ontario.

“It’s just amazing seeing all walks of life come through here, so many different people,” said Mel Marsden manager of Medicine Wheel Natural Healing.

They’ve been coming for everything lip balm to skin ointment, candy and, of course, a variety of marijuana.

But the owner said it’s also about creating jobs.

“Were creating an employment boom and economic boom,” said owner Rob Stevenson, “We’re going to have bakers, we’re going to have Indigenous growers and that’s something that we’re really trying to focus on

But as shops like these continue to pop up on First Nations as Canada gets closer to legalizing pot some say there are challenges that need to be looked at.

“I remain optimistic that First Nations will benefit from any revenue generated from these ventures, while historically Ontario First Nations have been neglected in resource revenue sharing with the province of Ontario, this new industry provides an opportunity to turn a new leaf and to examine innovative revenue sharing opportunities,” said Chief Isadore Day of the Chiefs of Ontario.

But Stevenson said there shouldn’t be any interference from Ottawa.

“Each community is different, first of all, and I think it should be up to each community on how dispensaries and growing is run on those communities,” he said.